Savage: VIDEO of Muslims Attacking Jews at Demo for Kidnapped Jewish Teens but NY Times Blames “Economics” on Why Jews are Fleeing France

ByPamela Geller on June 20, 2014

There was a humane demonstration in Paris in support of the three Jewish boys who were kidnapped last week by jihad savages. Muslims, of course, attacked the Jews. It’s indicative of just how horrible it really is in Europe — that it is an act of real courage to attend a rally in support of kidnapped Jewish children.

Islamic Jew-hatred — it’s in the quran.

Political and media elites attack and smear me for our bus and subway ads. But did they cover this barbarity? Of course not. The enemedia is hellbent on destroying my colleagues and me. They voluntarily act as the contemporary analogue to Der Stürmer — propaganda arm for Hamas groups like CAIR.

Video thanks to Armaros

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But The New York Times story today on the Jews fleeing Europe tries to pervert the motive. The Jews are leaving for economic reasons. The Times resorts to that old antisemitic idea —  it’s about money. Vile. France is the country of these Jews. They are French – imagine what it would take for you to be forced to leave your native homeland. They love France, it is their country. But the NY Times ‘journalist’  Dan Bilefsky sees it this way.

“…the decision is being driven by a complex combination of factors, including the cultural pull of Israel and France’s flat economy, especially for the younger generation drawn by the possibility of other opportunities in a more vibrant Israeli economy.

When Bilsky finally does mention the Muslims, it’s to emphatically state that the Jews and the Muslims is ‘peaceful’.

Miriam Monsonego, daughter of school headmaster Rabbi Yaacov Monsonego, who was killed in a shooting attack at the Ozar Hatorah School in Toulouse

Miriam Monsonego, daughter of school headmaster Rabbi Yaacov Monsonego, one of the victims of a Jihadist’s massacre at a Jewish day school.

Here is the whole article – a stunning indictment of The NY Times bias and twisted reportage:

PARIS — For Tiffany Taieb Nizard, the decision to abandon France for Israel came this month when a French-born man was accused of gunning down four people at the Jewish Museum in Brussels in an anti-Semitic attack.

It was just the tipping point. Earlier, Ms. Taieb Nizard, a 32-year-old mother of two, says she was punched on the bustling Champs-Élysée by a gang of Muslim girls who called her “dirty Jew.” Last year, a man in her upscale neighborhood on the edge of Paris complained to the police about her sister’s Sukkah, a ritual hut erected for a Jewish holiday, she said. She insists that her orthodox husband wear a baseball cap over his skullcap to avoid being harassed. A graduate in management, she said, she was also struggling to find a job.

“I love France, and this is my country, but I am disgusted now,” she says. “In Israel there is an army that will protect us. Here, I can no longer see a future for my children.”

While hers was a personal decision, other Jews in France are doing the same. And while the number is relatively small — 1,407 of France’s roughly 500,000 Jews left in the first three months of the year — it is four times higher than for the same period last year, according to the Jewish Agency for Israel, which coordinates the migration of Jews to Israel.


A surveillance camera image of a man suspected of a deadly attack at the Jewish Museum in Brussels last month. Credit Federal Police/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Jewish leaders say the decision is being driven by a complex combination of factors, including the cultural pull of Israel and France’s flat economy, especially for the younger generation drawn by the possibility of other opportunities in a more vibrant Israeli economy.

But the main catalyst, they say, is a growing awareness of a seemingly greater acceptance of anti-Semitism, here and in other parts of Europe, where the success of far-right parties in elections for the European Parliament in May, including by the National Front in France and neo-Nazi parties in Hungary and Greece, has created a less friendly, and sometimes, even hostile environment for Jews and other minorities.

Serge Cwajgenbaum, a Frenchman who is secretary general of the Brussels-based European Jewish Congress, stressed that a majority of France’s Jews were remaining in France and constituted a thriving and well-integrated community. He said relations between Jews and the country’s roughly six million Muslims were by in large peaceful.

He also emphasized, however, that the shifting political winds were heightening the anxieties of European Jewery. “French anxiety represents the general anxiety of Jews in Europe, who fear for their safety and future,” he said. “If the situation continues there will be an accelerated movement out of Europe.”

Last year, 3,288 French Jews emigrated to Israel — a 72 percent increase over 2012. For the first time since 1948, the year the state of Israel was founded, French émigrés surpassed the number of American Jews emigrating to Israel. This year, the Jewish Agency for Israel says it expects some 5,000 to make aliyah, the Hebrew word for immigration to Israel that translates literally as “to ascend.” The agency said that while globally emigration to Israel was stagnating, French Jews were the notable exception.

In a November 2013 survey of Jews in eight European Union countries by the organization’s anti-racism agency, nearly a third said they had considered emigrating over the last five years because they did not feel safe as Jews. The study showed that France, Hungary and Belgium are perceived as having the most worrying levels of anti-Semitism. Nearly a quarter of those surveyed said they stayed away from Jewish events or locations for fear for their safety.

In France, for instance, Jews are the victims of 40 percent of hate crimes, according to the Jewish Community Protection Service, which tracks anti-Semitic incidents.

Jewish community leaders here say apprehension has escalated following a series of high-profile anti-Semitic attacks against Jews, most recently in May when two young brothers were beaten by two men with brass knuckles as they left a synagogue in Créteil near Paris.

In January, courts banned a series of shows by Dieudonné M’bala M’bala, a comedian of French and West African heritage, after state television had broadcast a video in which he said he regretted that a leading Jewish journalist had not been killed in the gas chambers. He also is credited with popularizing an inverted Nazi salute embraced by his many supporters.


A makeshift memorial at the entrance of the Jewish Museum in Brussels last month. Credit Georges Gobet/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

The Jewish community is still haunted by a 2012 killing rampage during which Mohammed Merah, a young Frenchman with Algerian roots shot and killed seven people, including three children and a rabbi, outside a school in Toulouse.

Ariel Kandel, the French-born director of the Jewish Agency’s French office, said that high-youth unemployment in France and an emotional connection to Israel were also spurring emigration. But he said growing social acceptance of anti-Semitism was a catalyst. “You have Marine Le Pen on the right and then you have Islamic radicalism and Jews are caught in the middle,” he said.

The Mediterranean city of Netanya in Israel has attracted so many French, including retirees drawn by sunny weather, that Israelis have called it the French Riviera. French-speaking real estate agents, notaries and lawyers in Israel catering for the new arrivals say they can barely keep up with demand.

On a recent evening, about 70 French Jews considering departing for Israel packed an information session at the Jewish Agency’s heavily guarded offices in Paris. An Agency official overseeing emigration, Eliaou Zenou, a Frenchman who had made aliyah, laid out the relative advantages — and challenges — of moving to Israel.

The would-be emigrants, he noted, would have to bid adieu to France’s 35-hour workweek, learn Hebrew, forsake foie gras in favor of hummus, find a job, work on Sundays, give up five-week holidays and, depending on their age, serve in the army.

In return, he stressed, they would gain cultural empowerment from living in the land of their ancestors and benefit from a dynamic start-up economy. And despite Israel’s reputation as a land of perpetual war and conflict, he added, Israelis lived an average 81.8 years compared with 81.5 years in France. “You gain three months,” he said.

“No one is saying you will become a C.E.O. overnight. But if you learn Hebrew and are willing to work, there are opportunities,” he said. “What you are about to do takes courage,” he added.

Don’t read the rest. You know what The Times is trying to do. Make the Jewish emigration out of Europe about anything but than what it really is – the jihad against the Jews.


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