US military personnel forced to submit to the sharia during Ramadan

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Our troops must adhere to the sharia during the Islamic month of Ramadan in Bahrain and other Muslim countries. Subjected to dawah (proselytizing) by an Islamic cultural adviser at the Naval Support Activity, soldiers are forced to sit through lessons on Islam. No eating, drinking, alcohol, smoking during the month of Ramadan.

This is what the Obama administration and the US military are obsessed with as armies of jihad tear through the Middle East.

Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 11.54.14 AM(File photo)

Military newspaper Stars and Stripes report:

“It actually made me want to do a lot more research into the religion,” said Petty Officer 1st Class James Ramirez.

Really? How about equal time for the Jewish faith? The Christian faith? The Hindu faith?

US military  are encouraged “to experience Iftar in a Ramadan tent.”

Why anyone who is not a Muslim must stop eating (except in secret) during Ramadan is another example of Islamic supremacism. Unlike Jewish law, which pertains only to Jews, and Canon Law, which pertains only to Catholics, the Sharia asserts its totalitarian authority over non-Muslims.

During the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, Jews fast from sunup to sundown. Nowhere and at no time has the idea of no one else eating been considered. Nor should it.

The idea that our servicemen and women cannot have a coffee on their drive to work is outrageous and indicative of how far the West has gone in the norming of the sharia. Muslims eat a giant meal before sunup, but our boys and girls can’t have a coffee while we defend these countries in many cases? Supremacism and submission.

And it doesn’t stop there. Our soldiers (men and women) must wear long sleeve shirts. No alcohol or smoking  is permitted, and if all this weren’t pathetic enough, soldiers are instructed to say “Ramadan Kareem.”

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US personnel in Bahrain prepare for Ramadan
By Hendrick Simoes
Stars and Stripes
Published: June 26, 2014 (thanks to witness)

Ali Hassan, a base cultural adviser at Naval Support Activity Bahrain, briefs about 150 U.S. personnel about Islam, the Islamic lunar calender, and about customs and traditions during Ramadan, Tuesday.

MANAMA, Bahrain — U.S. personnel accustomed to drinking their coffee on the drive to work will have to put that habit on hold for about a month. It’s one of a few lifestyle changes Americans will have to make during the holy month of Ramadan.

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. Officials expect Ramadan to begin at sunrise on Saturday, depending on when the new moon is sighted. The holy month lasts for approximately 30 days — until about July 28. For Muslims around the world, Ramadan is a month of fasting and devotion to God. Most Muslims fast from dawn to sunset, when families gather for Iftar — the meal that breaks the fast.

For the 8,200 U.S. personnel living here, and those serving throughout the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility — including servicemembers, civilian personnel, contractors and family members — the month may require changing some daily routines.

Businesses and government offices will reduce hours and most restaurants will be closed during daylight hours.

While not required to fast during Ramadan, in Bahrain, Americans can be fined or detained by local authorities for eating, drinking or smoking in public when off-base during daylight hours.

Navy officials are requiring U.S. personnel to dress more conservatively off-base during Ramadan. Although not a requirement by Bahraini authorities, the Navy is demanding that men wear long-sleeved shirts and women wear sleeved blouses that cover their elbows. Also, men must wear long trousers, and women should wear pants or skirts that cover the knees.

Base cultural advisers have spent the last few weeks conducting Ramadan briefs to educate Americans about the holy month. Ali Hassan briefed about 150 personnel Tuesday about Islam, the lunar calendar and customs and traditions during Ramadan.

“It actually made me want to do a lot more research into the religion,” said Petty Officer 1st Class James Ramirez. He said the additional requirements during the month aren’t a big deal to him. “For such a small period of time, it’s a small sacrifice,” he said.

Other servicemembers echoed that sentiment.

Hassan encouraged personnel to experience Iftar in a Ramadan tent, many of which are set up at various locations around Bahrain during the holy month and welcome non-Muslims.

“Make it a point to visit these tents while you’re here. You don’t know if you’ll ever come back to Bahrain in the future,” Hassan said during the brief.

While the tents offer a more traditional atmosphere, many restaurants put aside their regular menus during the month and serve special Iftar dinners.

Things to Know During Ramadan:

Eating, drinking, chewing and smoking in public are civil offenses in some Islamic countries.

Men should wear long sleeves and pants. Women’s sleeves should extend below the elbow and pants or skirts should cover the knees.

Avoid critical remarks about fasting or any religious practice.

Most restaurants will be closed except those in 4- and 5-star hotels.

Businesses alter and reduce hours during the day; some open at night until early morning hours.

Arabs are good hosts and may offer you food or refreshments during daylight hours. Such offers should be declined.

All consumption of alcohol by U.S. military personnel is prohibited at any off base public venue in the U.S. Navy 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility during Ramadan.

It’s customary to say ‘Ramadan Kareem’ during Ramadan.

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  • flappy4343

    President Obama is the only U.S. President to bow in submission while meeting another head of state. It nakes sense he would force our servicemen to demean themselves following Sharia rules. These actions and policies are an embarassment to the dignity of our nation and the blood & sacrifice of our nations servicemen & women .

  • Jeannine Kajdi

    I can understand the part of when you are visiting a country you abide by their rules. I have NO problem with that. My problem is that our TROOPS are NOT visiting. They were sent there to help and when working or on base we should be following the rules of conduct that are ours only. If they want to spend free time roaming with locals that is another issue.

  • jonsen

    these countries also have christians living there. :) so I don’t buy the host country customs crap.

  • Earl Reeves

    This is another BS headline. Try reading the article. All the military are being told to do is respect the Host Country’s culture. I was there about 30 years ago with the Military. We did as we pleased on post or in the Hotel, but when we went downtown we were expected to comply with the local culture. During their prayer times we had to either stop and wait till it was over or go into a store and wait. while in the store we could shop. Women wore robes that went to the ground. I had no problem with this and neither did all the people there.

  • Rick McCall

    The problem is not the customs of a host nation. The problem is the customs of our charlatan commander-in-chief.

  • Steven Robeson

    This is NOT “Military Sharia”…It’s the Armed Forces doing what they are REQUIRED to do under almost every SOFA (Status of Forces Agreement) that I had ever been familiar with while I was on active duty…RESPECT LOCAL CUSTOMS OFF BASE! When I was in both Japan and the Philippines, we frequently got “the word” passed about local celebrations, memorials, etc, and expected conduct when “out in the ville”.

  • Lynn Peterson

    they are pushing that shit in th schools, now in the services, get that black bastard out of the us n;ow……………hey obumass hope when you die it will be done in the fires of hell b/5 your sufering begins, why our government is allowng this is far beyon all human thoughts what are you getting out of this, money gold what. and the goverment we need you all out and gone for ever

  • Earl Reeves

    Did you bother to read the article? Try it, it helps. The troops are required to respect the customs of the Host country while down town. We did this 30 years ago. I saw nothing wrong with it. All we did was show respect for the locals.

  • Earl Reeves

    If they wear their native clothing or as you say their Religious Garb are they breaking any laws, rules, or customs. Our country is so engrossed in “Political Correctness” we let people get by with anything. Some places have required them to remove the coverings that cover their face.

  • Earl Reeves

    Did you read the article? Were you ever in a Muslim Country? I was about 30 years ago and on post or in our Hotel we did as we pleased. Down Town we were expected to respect the local customs and traditions. I think this is as it should be.

  • Earl Reeves

    You sound like one of the people that go into a foreign country and treat the local people like crap. I saw my share of them while serving in the Military. Whatever country I was in I tried to have respect for the people and their customs. You might try to read the article before acting an Ass. 30 years ago I was in Sauda Arabia in the Military. We were expected to have respect for the local people and their customs while off Post or out of the Hotel. What is wrong with that. The article simply said the troops today are expected to do the same.